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The words in italics refer to what is known as figures of speech which represent intentional deviation from literal statement or common usage. Read more about figures of speech in the passage below.

A figure of speech is a form of expression used to convey meaning or heighten effect, often by comparing or identifying one thing with another that has a meaning or connotation familiar to the reader or listener.

An integral part of language, figures of speech are found in oral literatures as well as in polished poetry and prose and in everyday speech.

Most figures in everyday speech are formed by extending the vocabulary of what is already familiar and better known to what is less well known. Thus metaphors (implied resemblances) derived from human physiology are commonly extended to nature or inanimate objects as in the expressions “the mouth of a river,” or “the eye of a needle.” Conversely, resemblances to natural phenomena are frequently applied to other areas, as in the expressions “a wave of enthusiasm,” or “a storm of abuse.” Use of simile (a comparison, usually indicated by “like” or “as”) is exemplified in “We were packed in the room like sardines.” Personification (speaking of an abstract quality or inanimate object as if it were a person) is exemplified in “Money talks”; metonymy (using the name of one thing for another closely related to it), in “How would the Pentagon react?”; synecdoche (use of a part to imply the whole), in expressions such as “brass” for high-ranking military officers or “hard hats” for construction workers. Other common forms of figurative speech are hyperbole (deliberate exaggeration for the sake of effect), as in “I'm so mad I could chew nails”; the rhetorical question (asked for effect, with no answer expected), as in “How can I express my thanks to you?”; litotes (an emphasis by negation), as in “It's no fun to be sick”; and onomatopoeia (imitation of natural sounds by words), in such words as “gurgle,” “plunk,” and “splash.” Almost all the figures of speech that appear in everyday speech may also be found in literature. In serious poetry and prose, however, their use is more fully conscious, more artistic, and much more subtle; it thus has a stronger intellectual and emotional impact, is more memorable, and sometimes contributes a range and depth of association and suggestion far beyond the scope of the casual colloquial use of imagery.

All languages use figures of speech, but differences of language dictate different stylistic criteria. In a culture not influenced by classical Greece and Rome, some figures may be absent; irony is likely to be confined to fairly sophisticated cultures. Japanese poetry is based on delicate structures of implication and an entire vocabulary of aesthetic values almost untranslatable to the West. Arabic literature is rich in simile and metaphor, but the constructions used are so different from those familiar in the West that translation requires much adaptation. This condition is also true of the oral literatures of Africa and of the written literatures deriving from them. One of the most powerful single literary influences upon world cultures has been the Bible. Both the Old Testament and the New Testament are rich in simile, metaphor, and personification and in the special figure of Hebrew poetry, parallelism.


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  • - Figures of Speech Handbook

    English Stylistics is meant as a manual illustrating the structure, types, usage, and functioning of English speech figures. Preface I think it is very important to understand the essence of each speech figure, and I share the idea of Thomas A. Knott that “The most important element in a human being is his thought. The next is the manner in which he communicates his thought.” The manual is intended both for seminars and individual work of intermediate and advanced students of... [читать подробенее]


  • - Figures of speech

    The words in italics refer to what is known as figures of speech which represent intentional deviation from literal statement or common usage. Read more about figures of speech in the passage below. A figure of speech is a form of expression used to convey meaning or heighten effect, often by comparing or identifying one thing with another that has a meaning or connotation familiar to the reader or listener. An integral part of language, figures of speech are found in oral literatures... [читать подробенее]